THE BIG DIPPER

Wilt outside Bishop FordBack in the day the Los Angeles Lakers practiced at Bishop Ford. Here’s Wilt Chamberlain outside Ford.

Thanks to my main man Carl.

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10 Responses to THE BIG DIPPER

  1. Markwestside says:

    Watch every day when they walked in the halls.

  2. Andrew Purdy says:

    Great stuff Red…some great talent went through those gym doors. Every year the city’s best tried out and practiced for the Empire State Games. I remember many of the top college coaches would be in the Ford bleachers watching the practices and tryouts.

    • hoopscoach says:

      Andrew,

      Great to hear from you.

      Hope all is well on your end.

      Have you seen what they did to P.S. 154 schoolyard?

      I always think of the nights you and I spent there playing ball.

      Red

  3. Mike larkin says:

    What your sign dipper?….. the dollar sign.

    • hoopscoach says:

      Mike,

      Classic line.

      Here’s another:

      “They say that nobody is perfect. Then they tell you practice makes perfect. I wish they’d make up their minds…”

  4. Tonyfas16 says:

    When I coached girls Fast Pitch Softball I used to tell them. Practice doesn’t make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect.

  5. Dan Falcone says:

    I attended Ford and was there when the Lakers practiced. I remember seeing Wilt get out of the van – biggest man I’d ever seen. Thanks for sharing – it brings back memories. I’m probably in that crowd. We were all waiting outside Ford’s gym for the team to drive up.

  6. George Farrell says:

    Can anyone explain to me why Bishop Ford closed? There are still a lot of kids growing up in the area so I don’t think it’s declining enrollment and I cannot think of any nearby Catholic High Schools that are drawing away students. Seems curious to me. When I graduated HNS in 1955 the closest Catholic HS were St. Michaels on 43rd Street in Sunset Park and St. Augustines on Sterling Place in Park Slope. Both were Diocesan schools which meant they were tuition-free (supported by the Diocese) but they accepted only the top students from each grammar school in their catchment area. HNS was within St. Michael’s catchment area which meant only two or three guys from my class qualified. Lotsa smart guys in my class and competition was fierce because a four- year scholarship meant a lot to a working class family. The rest of us shlubs had to make do with some far away school with hefty tuition. The only public high school nearby was Manual Training where they majored in making zip guns in shop class (that was the rumor). It wasn’t until the baby boomers came of age in the late 50’s and early 60’s that new schools were built in Brooklyn and Queens. Bishop Ford, Xaverian, Archbishop Molloy, Holy Cross, Msgr. McClancy, et al.

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