STOOPDREAMER

Our very own, Pat Fenton, an outstanding Journalist and Playwright is taking his show on the road.

This coming Thursday night, April 19th Pat will be reading from ‘Stoopdreamer and Other Brooklyn Stories‘.

The show gets under way at 7:30 PM at the Cell Theater in the heart of the Chelsea section of Manhattan. (338 West 23rd Street between 8th and 9th avenues)

Pat intimates the dreams, trials and travails of just ordinary people trying to find the American dream in post WWII Windsor Terrace.

Among them a cop who really wanted to be a writer.

A movie projectionist whose life is defined by the continuance of movie reels as he waits for the changeover mark.

The 9th avenue pool hustler whose small piece of the American dream, two weeks summer vacation over a Rockaway Saloon, Fitzgerald’s, is dangerously gambled one night, and a beautiful dreamer named Janie Joyce who tried to go home again and almost made it.

Irish-American stories about an area that was once the hub of one of the greatest, Irish-working class neighborhoods in Brooklyn.

If you are looking for something to do Thursday night, head out and support one of our very own from the old neighborhood!

You can’t beat the price…It’s FREE!

Good luck Pat!

Respectfully,

Red

Hoops135@hotmail.com

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35 Responses to STOOPDREAMER

  1. Pat Fenton says:

    Much thanks for all your support, Steve. It means a lot to me. It looks like the Cell Theatre is very serious about this play, and that the next step will be a fully staged production, music, sound effects, etc. And when that happens a piece of that great neighborhood of ours we were all lucky enough to have come from, Windsor Terrace, will live again on the stage. Many of the scenes take place in Farrell’s Bar.

    I’ll save a seat for you in the front row along with Denis and Pete Hamill. Thanks again for the mention; the pints are on me at Farrell’s when you get back this way. (Send me your phone number again through my e-mail.)
    Pat

  2. Maureen Rice (Flanagan) says:

    oh, I HATE that I can’t make this, I have been to the Cell twice for Pat’s readings, both times were fabulous- I work late on Thursdays and this week, will just be getting home from NOLA on Tuesday- no way I can make it- but if you are in NY and you can- GO!!

  3. Tonyf16thSt says:

    Everyone sat on a stoop back in the day. Neighbors would walk up and down the block stopping and chatting it up we didn’t have cell phones or computers so you stayed in touch by going out on the stoop. My pops kept a bucket of water in the aerie for the junk mans, fruit mans, fish mans horse.

  4. David Cullen says:

    Love that photo, Steve. I remember seeing several movies, including “Taxi Driver”, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” “Jaws,” and several other mid to late 1970s films there. The Sanders, by about 1976 was an inexpensive theater that showed movies a few months AFTER the movies were released. Even though I would guess 1980, anyone know what year the original Sanders closed down?

    • hoopscoach says:

      David,

      I recall seeing the film ‘Papillon’ with Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman at Sanders. I think I was 11.

      So many stories behind that place.

  5. Pat Fenton says:

    Gladys, I grew up on 17th Street in the late 40‘s and early 50‘s, top floor left, at 483. Dr Gardner’s office was right next store. When I was a kid, my father, from Galway Ireland, carried me down the stairs of our railroad room flat and Dr Gardner took my tonsils out. I remember it like it was yesterday.

    It was like something out of the old west; they put me down on the table, gave me some ether, and I woke up later in my bed. The only other medication I got was all the fresh ice cream I could eat.

    The amazing thing is, the tiny, one story building where he had his office is still there, seemingly untouched by time. That, and Farrell’s Bar, and Holy Name Church and Schoolyard, are the few things left to verify something great once happened here in Windsor Terrace, our town.

    As a kid, I played basketball in that schoolyard, and when my son, grown up now, was about fifteen, I took him back to the empty schoolyard one brisk fall day, and we shot hoops together. We were just a few feet away from the stone of the wall where I remembered clapping erasers on some lonely, winter’s day. I can still hear the echo.

    Pat Fenton

    • Gladys Mastrion says:

      Pat, Dr. Gardner took my tonsils out also in the office! I remember the same thing as you, the mask coming down on my face! Ice Cream for a few days after too! It was 1950 I was only 2 years old, but I will never forget it. I lived at 485 17st in Dr. Gardner’s house from 1948 to 1964. I made my communion in 1954, they had just torn down the houses on 18 st. my father took me there to take pictures. My pictures looked like I made my communion in Sarajevo after the war! Everybody got their pictures taken by the cross in front of the church, I got the ruins of 9 ave. & 18 st! My Great-grandmother Mrs. Long lived in the apartment below us, her girlfriend Mrs. Savane across the street, used to come over for tea & Ebingers crumb cake, and gossip. I was always told “don’t you ever repeat anything you hear at this table”. Guess I will have to take all those stories to the grave with me…

  6. jiimyvac says:

    I remember seeing alot of movies there including the Exorcist.. I remember Donny Rice, someone else and I stuck around for the second showing and started screaming and got the whole crowd yelling…..
    My house on Windsor was one of the few without a stoop. In 2006,, when we renovated the ghouse, we added a metal stoop and whenever i can, I like sitting there and just hanging out, better late than never.
    I would guess Sanders closed around 1979,,,

  7. jiimyvac says:

    That picture is from circa 1950… great shot

    • Gene Green says:

      The movie Mr. Music came out in Dec 1950. I like the idea of teh double billing. Now you get one movie. How many of us can remember having the flashlight shine in the eyes once you made noise. Many a Saturday morning watching a double feature and cartoons. I think the trolleys ran until the late 50’s. I was born in 53 but have some memories of seeing the trolleys..

  8. Tonyf16thSt says:

    Saturday matinees and malmac dishes. Then it was Moms pizza 2 slices @ 15cents each and a nickle coke.

  9. Jack Kelly says:

    I guess that was the thing back then. I had my Tonsils removed in my Doctors office on 12th Street . My Mom told me years later that they almost lost me because of the loss of blood and then my dad chimed in “It all worked out. The Doctor was so frightened he didn’t charge us!”

  10. Bill LaVasseur says:

    Hi Pat,
    Do you recall the Creggs living on PPW and 17th street? My mother Loretta was the youngest daughter, number 8 of 9 children.
    On another note, I think everyone in our neighborhood used a stoop for everything; hanging out, off the point, home base in 1 of 100 games we played. You go through the area today on a Saturday or Sunday and there is no one on the stoop. On my block on Prospect Ave, there were families or kids on evry other stoop.. mothers or fathers sitting on the top step watching over evryone. Times have truely changed.

    • Pat Fenton says:

      Yes, I do, Bill. They lived in “Old Lady Brown’s” house.) I knew many of them. I went to Holy Name with Bernie Cregg(your Uncle?) And I can’t think of the name of the oldest one of the boys, but I played pool with him and drank beers many times, along with Jack Malone in Kerrigan’s Bar.
      Pat

      • Bob Taylor says:

        my name is Bob Taylor and I live in Las Vegas. I was born in Queens New York and my grandfather, Thomas Kerrigan owned the Kerrigans bar in Brooklyn. It appears that you have been there I was wondering if I can learn more about the bar and possibly more about my grandfather during those days. He spent his life as a New York City policeman and rose to captain of the 12th precinct. On retirement he opened the bar. I would really like to understand more about the bar the neighborhood and my grandfather. I didn’t even know that bar with still open under the Kerrigan Bar name until recently.

      • hoopscoach says:

        Hello Bob, hope all is well. Thanks for checking in.

  11. jiimyvac says:

    I was born in 1960 and I remember Dr. chneider making a house call to my house around 1972…..I passed out getting fitted for a bowling ball with her fingers in the sizing ball.. my dad took me home by bus… cab was out of the question and we were between cars….

  12. Kevin Mahoney says:

    I lived right on 14th Street and I remember the last Saturday before the Sanders closed for good, they let kids in for free and played cartoons all day. All the popcorn, soda, etc. was free also, as I guess they were trying to get rid of the stuff. I was about 10, so around 1978 sounds right for a closing time. The one major film I saw there was “Rocky” in 1976, and I can remember the line for tickets going down 15th Street.

  13. Tonyf16thSt says:

    How about House visits? I remember Dr. Lacavaro coming to the house when we got sick.

  14. Pat Fenton says:

    Hi, Gladys. What a small world! What are the odds of both of us having our tonsils removed by Dr Gardener? Great neighborhood. (I’m going to try to send Steve a scene from my play “Stoopdreamer” which describes a man who runs the film in the Sander;s Theatre. )Maybe he could post it here.

    In the long hallway of my house I have a picture I once took looking down 17th Street from Kerrigan’s Bar on the corner(later Joy Ryan’s Shamrock bar where I did some bartending.) I can see my old walkup at 483,and your building next door; next to Dr Gardner’s office.
    I wondered if you knew the Wilton’s who lived in your building when I was growing up(late 40’s, 50’s.) I’m not sure when they moved. Years later, I would meet one of them when I was in the Army, Danny Wilton. If Steve has your e-mail address, ask him to send it to me.
    best,
    Pat

    • Gene Green says:

      Pat If you were tending bar in Shamrocks in the early 70’s you served an underage Guy. I use to pass between Shamrock and McNultys when I was 16 and 17. Once I hit 18 it was Farrells :-). Seems that all the bars are gone or coffee shops now. Thankfully Farrells has not changed and McBears is still a nice place.

      • hoopscoach says:

        Gene,

        Things change my man. It looks like there are a few very cool spots moving in on the avenue…

    • Bob kerrigan says:

      Hi Pat
      I was looking for some information about Kerrigan’s (my grandfather’s) bar. Do you remember the address or the intersection it was on? Do you know if that old building is still there? Does anyone remember my dad, Jack. He used to bar tend there. Lastly I have been looking for a photo of Kerrigan’s Bar. Do you (or anyone) have one? Can you post a photo on this forum?
      Bob Kerrigan

  15. Bill LaVasseur says:

    Hi Pat,
    What a small world. Sadly my Uncle Bernie passed away in 2005. His older brothers were John, Tommy, and Bobby, have also passed on. My Aunt Gerry and my mom Loretta are the only siblings alive. Its funny you mention old Lady Brown. I still remember her, she scared the hell out of me sitting at the top of stairs when I would visit my grandfather. She was like a shadowy figure to me.
    I hope you do well with your show. I cannot attend on the 19th but hope to do so in the future, I’d loved to hear stories from my parents era. Good Luck

    • Pat Fenton says:

      Thanks for your kind words, Bill. Up on 17th Street, the Creggs were what we used to call “Good People.” And I’m very sorry to hear of your loss.
      Pat

  16. TonyF16thSt says:

    Didn’t Old Lady Brown always walk around like a bum with long stringy hair and glasses, she used to push a baby carrage around with cats in it and junk
    am on correct on this?

    • Pat Fenton says:

      You certainly are, Tony. She was a retired school teacher. Imagine being in her class? I’ll take the nuns from Holy Name first.
      Pat

  17. Bob kerrigan says:

    My name is Bob Kerrigan. My Grandfather was Thomas Kerrigan, my dad was John Kerrigan. I was doing some research on the old bar and Bobby Taylor’s comments came up.
    Hi Bob.

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